SYLLABUS(IX-XII)

ADMISSION >> SYLLABUS(IX-XII)

 

Syllabus for Class – IX Entrance Examination

 Syllabus for Class IX Examination will be the contents of Class VIII

Mathematics 

Number System

(i) Rational Numbers   (ii) Power  (iii) (a) Squares, Square roots  (iv) (b) Cubes, Cube, roots

Algebra:(i) Algebraic Expressions

Geometry:(i) Understanding shapes:

Properties of quadrilaterals — Sum of angles of a quadrilateral is equal to 360o (By verification)

Properties of parallelogram (By verification)

Drawing 2-D representation of 3-D objects (Continued and extended)

Counting vertices, edges & faces &: verifying Euler’s relation for 3-D figures with flat faces (cubes, cuboids, tetrahedrons, prisms and pyramids)

Construction of Quadrilaterals:

Mensuration

Area of a trapezium and a polygon.Concept of volume, measurement of volumc using a basic unit, volume of a cube, cuboid and Cylinder. Volume and capacity (measuremcnt of capacity),Surface area of a cube, cuboid, cylinder. Data handling and probability

Introduction to graphs

English Syllabus

PROSE: POETRY

Items under Reading and writing should include:

  1. Unseen passage for comprehension and ability to judge and differentiate ideas involved.
  2. Reading to narrate experiences, describe objects and people
  3. Writing 1 letters, messages. invitations, and paragraphs.
  4. GRAMMAR:

To learn and practice in given context the following items: -

Sentence types .tense forms .uses of tenses. Clauses, PHRASES, Modal auxiliaries Adjectives and adverbs .Determines ,Linking words ,Use of easy phrase and idioms. Voices,, speech

Science Syllabus

  1. Crop Production and Management:

:-Agriculture Crop Protection, Harvest and Storage

  1. Microorganisms: Friend and Foe :-World of Microorganisms ,  Dealing with Harmful Microorganisms, Food Preservation
  2. Introduction to Cells.
  3. Reproduction in Animals Sexual Reproduction in Animals
  4. Synthetic Fibres and Plastics Materials:
  5. Metals and Non-Metals.
  6. Natural Gases,
  7. Combustion and Flame
  8. Pollution
  9. Force and Pressure,
  10. Friction and its Types
  11. Characteristics of Sound,
  12. Chemical Effects of Electric Current : Conductivity of Liquids,
  13. Natural Phenomena :-Lightning, Protection from Lightning, Earthquakes,
  14. Light : Reflection in Plane Mirrors, Light and Eyes,
  15. The Solar System, :- Stars Celestial Bodies, Solar System Other Members of Solar System, constellation

Social Science

  1. How when and where
  2. How trade to territory
  3. Ruling the country side
  4. Tribal dikes and the vision of golden age.
  5. Revolt of 1875 (The first ware of independence)
  6. Colonialism and the story of imperial city. 
  7. Resoles (Land, water, natural, vegetarian, wildlife) 
  8. Agriculture
  9. Industries
  10. Human Resources
  11. Indian constitution
  12. Secularism
  13. Why do we vard a parliament 
  14. Understanding laws
  15. Judiciary
  16. Understanding our criminal justice system
  17. Understanding marginalization
  18. Confront line marginalization 
  19. Public facilities
  20. Law and social justice.

 Paper Pattern: Subjective Paper.

                        English-20 marks

                        Maths-50 marlks

                        Science+Social Science-30 marks

Syllabus for Class – X Entrance Examination

 Syllabus for Class IX Examination will be the contents of Class IX and some enriched topic.

 Science Syllabus

Unit I: Matter - Nature and Behaviour

Definition of matter; solid, liquid and gas; characteristics - shape, volume, density; change of state-melting (absorption of heat), freezing, evaporation (cooling by evaporation), condensation, sublimation.

Nature of matter: Elements, compounds and mixtures. Heterogenous and homogenous mixtures, colloids and suspensions.

Mole Concept: Relationship of mole to mass of the particles and numbers. Valency. Chemical formula of common compounds.

Structure of atom: Electrons, protons and neutrons; Isotopes and isobars.

Unit II: Organization in the Living World

Cell - Basic Unit of life: Cell as a basic unit of life; prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, multicellular organisms; cell membrane and cell wall, cell organelles; chloroplast, mitochondria, vacuoles, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus; nucleus, chromosomes - basic structure, number. Cell Division , Mitosis and Meiosis ,Membrane Transport (Diffusion , Osmosis , OP , DPD)

Tissues, Organs, Organ System, Organism:

Structure and functions of animal and plant tissues (four types in animals; meristematic and permanent tissues in plants).Anatomy of Root Stem and Leaves .

Unit III: Motion, Force and Work

System and Units

Motion: Distance and displacement, velocity; uniform and non-uniform motion along a straight line; acceleration, distance-time and velocity-time graphs for uniform motion and uniformly accelerated motion, equations of motion by graphical method; elementary idea of uniform circular motion.

Force and Newton's laws: Force and motion, Newton's laws of motion, inertia of a body, inertia and mass, momentum, force and acceleration. Elementary idea of conservation of momentum, action and reaction forces.Impulse

Gravitation: Gravitation; universal law of gravitation, force of gravitation of the earth (gravity), acceleration due to gravity; mass and weight; free fall.

Unit V: Food Production

Plant and animal breeding and selection for quality improvement and management; use of fertilizers, manures; protection from pests and diseases; organic farming.

Gene Modification , Breeding and Selection

Unit VI: Matter - Its Nature and Behaviour

Particle nature, basic units: atoms and molecules. Law of constant proportions. Atomic and molecular masses.

Mole Concept: Relationship of mole to mass of the particles and numbers. Valency. Chemical formula of common compounds.

Structure of atom: Electrons, protons and neutrons; Isotopes and isobars.

Unit VII: Organization in the Living World

Biological Diversity: Diversity of plants and animals - basic issues in scientific naming, basis of classification. Hierarchy of categories / groups, Major groups of plants (salient features) (Bacteria, Thalophyta, Bryo phyta, Pteridophyta, gymnosperms and Angiosperms). Major groups of animals (salient features) (Non-chordates upto phyla and chordates upto classes).

Detail study of all five kingdom upto level of class.

Health and Diseases: Health and its failure. Infectious and Non-infectious diseases, their causes and manifestation. Diseases caused by microbes (Virus, Bacteria and protozoans) and their prevention, Principles of treatment and prevention. Pulse polio programmes.

Component of food , Balanced Diet , Under Nutrition and Malnutrition

Concept of Vaccines ,Antibiotics and Types of Disease

Unit VIII: Motion, Force and Work

Floatation: Thrust and pressure. Archimedes' principle, buoyancy, elementary idea of relative density.

Work, energy and power: Work done by a force, energy, power; kinetic and potential energy; law of conservation of energy.

Sound: Nature of sound and its propagation in various media, speed of sound, range of hearing in humans; ultrasound; reflection of sound; echo and SONAR. Structure of the human ear (auditory aspect only).RADAR and Noise Pollution.

Unit IX: Our environment

Physical resources: Air, Water, Soil. Air for respiration, for combustion, for moderating temperatures; movements of air and its role in bringing rains across India. Air, water and soil pollution (brief introduction). Holes in ozone layer and the probable damages. 

Energy Crisis and Alternate sources of energy and Bio Geo Chemical Cycle.

Bio-geo chemical cycles in nature: Water, oxygen, carbon and nitrogen.

Periodic Table: General Information

Chemical Bonding: General information regarding covalent bond and ionic bond.

 Mathematics Syllabus

UNIT I: NUMBER SYSTEMS

1. REAL NUMBERS

  1. Review of representation of natural numbers, integers, rational numbers on the number line. Representation of terminating / non-terminating recurring decimals, on the number line through successive magnification. Rational numbers as recurring/terminating decimals.
  2. Examples of non-recurring / non-terminating decimals. Existence of non-rational numbers (irrational numbers) such as √2, √3 and their representation on the number line. Explaining that every real number is represented by a unique point on the number line and conversely, every point on the number line represents a unique real number.
  3. Existence of √x for a given positive real number x (visual proof to be emphasized).
  4. Definition of nth root of a real number.
  5. Recall of laws of exponents with integral powers. Rational exponents with positive real bases (to be done by particular cases, allowing learner to arrive at the general laws.)
  6. Rationalization (with precise meaning) of real numbers of the type (and their combinations)

UNIT II: ALGEBRA

1. POLYNOMIALS 

Definition of a polynomial in one variable, its coefficients, with examples and counter examples, its terms, zero polynomial.

Degree of a polynomial. Constant, linear, quadratic and cubic polynomials; monomials, binomials, trinomials. Factors and multiples. Zeros of a polynomial. State and motivate the Remainder Theorem with examples. Statement and proof of the Factor Theorem. Factorization of (ax2 + bx + c, a + 0 where a, b and c are real numbers, and of cubic polynomials using the Factor Theorem) dt quadratic & cubic polynomial.

Recall of algebraic expressions and identities. Further verification of identities of the type (x + y + z)2 = x2 + y2 + z2 + 2xy + 2yz + 2zx, (x ± y)3 = x3 ± y3 ± 3xy (x ± y), x³ ± y³ = (x ± y) (x² ± xy + y²), x3 + y3 + z3 - 3xyz = (x + y + z) (x2 + y2 + z2 - xy - yz - zx) and their use in factorization of polymonials. Simple expressions reducible to these polynomials.

UNIT III: GEOMETRY

1. INTRODUCTION TO EUCLID'S GEOMETRY

History - Geometry in India and Euclid's geometry. Euclid's method of formalizing observed phenomenon into rigorous mathematics with definitions, common/obvious notions, axioms/postulates and theorems. The five postulates of Euclid. Equivalent versions of the fifth postulate. Showing the relationship between axiom and theorem, for example:

  • (Axiom) 1. Given two distinct points, there exists one and only one line through them.
  • (Theorem) 2. (Prove) Two distinct lines cannot have more than one point in common.

2. LINES AND ANGLES

  1. (Motivate) If a ray stands on a line, then the sum of the two adjacent angles so formed is 180° and the converse.
  2. (Prove) If two lines intersect, vertically opposite angles are equal.
  3. (Motivate) Results on corresponding angles, alternate angles, interior angles when a transversal intersects two parallel lines.
  4. (Motivate) Lines which are parallel to a given line are parallel.
  5. (Prove) The sum of the angles of a triangle is 180°.
  6. (Motivate) If a side of a triangle is produced, the exterior angle so formed is equal to the sum of the two interior opposite angles.

3. TRIANGLES

  1. (Motivate) Two triangles are congruent if any two sides and the included angle of one triangle is equal to any two sides and the included angle of the other triangle (SAS Congruence).
  2. (Prove) Two triangles are congruent if any two angles and the included side of one triangle is equal to any two angles and the included side of the other triangle (ASA Congruence).
  3. (Motivate) Two triangles are congruent if the three sides of one triangle are equal to three sides of the other triangle (SSS Congruene).
  4. (Motivate) Two right triangles are congruent if the hypotenuse and a side of one triangle are equal (respectively) to the hypotenuse and a side of the other triangle.
  5. (Prove) The angles opposite to equal sides of a triangle are equal.
  6. (Motivate) The sides opposite to equal angles of a triangle are equal.
  7. (Motivate) Triangle inequalities and relation between 'angle and facing side' inequalities in triangles.

UNIT IV: COORDINATE GEOMETRY

1. COORDINATE GEOMETRY

The Cartesian plane, coordinates of a point, names and terms associated with the coordinate plane, notations, plotting points in the plane, graph of linear equations as examples; focus on linear equations of the type Ax + By + C = 0 by writing it as y = mx + c.

UNIT V: MENSURATION

1. AREAS

Area of a triangle using Heron's formula (without proof) and its application in finding the area of a quadrilateral. Area of cyclic quadrilateral (with proof) - Brahmagupta's formula.

UNIT II: ALGEBRA (Contd.)

2. LINEAR EQUATIONS IN TWO VARIABLES

Recall of linear equations in one variable. Introduction to the equation in two variables. Focus on linear equations of the type ax+by+c=0. Prove that a linear equation in two variables has infinitely many solutions and justify their being written as ordered pairs of real numbers, plotting them and showing that they seem to lie on a line. Examples, problems from real life, including problems on Ratio and Proportion and with algebraic and graphical solutions being done simultaneously.

UNIT III: GEOMETRY (Contd.)

4. QUADRILATERALS

  1. (Prove) The diagonal divides a parallelogram into two congruent triangles.
  2. (Motivate) In a parallelogram opposite sides are equal, and conversely.
  3. (Motivate) In a parallelogram opposite angles are equal, and conversely.
  4. (Motivate) A quadrilateral is a parallelogram if a pair of its opposite sides is parallel and equal.
  5. (Motivate) In a parallelogram, the diagonals bisect each other and conversely.
  6. (Motivate) In a triangle, the line segment joining the mid points of any two sides is parallel to the third side and (motivate) its converse.

5. AREA

Review concept of area, recall area of a rectangle.

  1. (Prove) Parallelograms on the same base and between the same parallels have the same area.
  2. (Motivate) Triangles on the same (or equal base) base and between the same parallels are equal in area.

6. CIRCLES

Through examples, arrive at definitions of circle related concepts, radius, circumference, diameter, chord, arc, secant, sector, segment subtended angle.

  1. (Prove) Equal chords of a circle subtend equal angles at the center and (motivate) its converse.
  2. (Motivate) The perpendicular from the center of a circle to a chord bisects the chord and conversely, the line drawn through the center of a circle to bisect a chord is perpendicular to the chord.
  3. (Motivate) There is one and only one circle passing through three given non-collinear points.
  4. (Motivate) Equal chords of a circle (or of congruent circles) are equidistant from the center (or their repective centers) and conversely.
  5. (Prove) The angle subtended by an arc at the center is double the angle subtended by it at any point on the remaining part of the circle.
  6. (Motivate) Angles in the same segment of a circle are equal.
  7. (Motivate) If a line segment joining two points subtends equal angle at two other points lying on the same side of the line containing the segment, the four points lie on a circle.
  8. (Motivate) The sum of either of the pair of the opposite angles of a cyclic quadrilateral is 180° and its converse.

7. CONSTRUCTIONS

  1. Construction of bisectors of line segments and angles of measure 60°, 90°, 45° etc., equilateral triangles.
  2. Construction of a triangle given its base, sum/difference of the other two sides and one base angle.
  3. Construction of a triangle of given perimeter and base angles.

UNIT V: MENSURATION (Contd.)

2. SURFACE AREAS AND VOLUMES

Surface areas and volumes of cubes, cuboids, spheres (including hemispheres) and right circular cylinders/cones.

UNIT VI: STATISTICS

Introduction to Statistics: Collection of data, presentation of data - tabular form, ungrouped / grouped, bar graphs, histograms (with varying base lengths), frequency polygons, qualitative analysis of data to choose the correct form of presentation for the collected data. Mean, median, mode of ungrouped data.

UNIT VII: PROBABILITY

History, Repeated experiments and observed frequency approach to probability. Focus is on empirical probability. (A large amount of time to be devoted to group and to individual activities to motivate the concept; the experiments to be drawn from real - life situations, and from examples used in the chapter on statistics).

 Social Science Syllabus

Unit 1: India and the Contemporary World - I

Term I: Two themes from the first sub-unit and one each from the second and third sub-units could be studied.

Sub-unit 1.1: Events and processes

In this unit the focus is on three events and processes that have in major ways shaped the identity of the modern world. Each represents a different form of politics, and a specific combination of forces. One event is linked to the growth of liberalism and democracy, one with socialism, and one with a negation of both democracy and socialism. 

Two themes of the following:

I. The French Revolution: (a)The Ancient Regime and its crises. (b) The social forces that led to the revolution. (c) The different revolutionary groups and ideas of the time. (d) The legacy. (Compulsory Chapter-1) 

II. Socialism in Europe and the Russian Revolution: (a) The crises of Tzarism. (b) The nature of social movements between 1905 and 1917. (c) The First World War and foundation of Soviet state. (d) The legacy. (Chapter 2) 

III. Nazism and the Rise of Hitler: (a) The growth of social democracy (b) The crises in Germany. (b) The basis of Hitler's rise to power. (c) The ideology of Nazism. (d) The impact of Nazism. (Chapter 3)

Map Work - Theme one only (3 marks)

Term II

Sub-unit 1.2: Livelihoods, Economies and Societies

The themes in this section will focus on how different social groups grapple with the changes in the contemporary world and how these changes affect their lives. 

Any one theme of the following:

IV. Forest Society and Colonialism: (a) Relationship between forests and livelihoods. (b) Changes in forest societies under colonialism.

Case studies: Focus on two forest movements one in colonial India (Bastar) and one in Indonesia. (Chapter 4)

V. Pastoralists in the Modern World: (a)Pastoralism as a way of life. (b) Different forms of pastoralism. (c) What happens to pastoralism under colonialism and modern states?

Case studies: Focus on two pastoral groups, one from Africa and one from India. (Chapter 5)

VI. Peasants and Farmers: (a) Histories of the emergence of different forms of farming and peasant societies. (b) Changes within rural economies in the modern world.

Case studies: focus on contrasting forms of rural change and different forms of rural societies (expansion of large-scale wheat and cotton farming in USA,rural economy and the Agricultural Revolution in England, and small peasant production in colonial India) (Chapter 6)

Map Work Based on theme 4/5/6. (Internal choice will be provided) (3 marks)

Sub-unit 1.3: Everyday Life, Culture and Politics

The themes in this unit will consider how issues of culture are linked up to the making of contemporary world.

Any one of the following:

VII. History and Sport: The Story of Cricket: (a) The emergence of cricket as an English sport. (b) Cricket and colonialism. (c) Cricket nationalism and de-colonialization. (Chapter 7)

VIII. Clothing: A Social History: (a) A short history of changes in clothing. (b) Debates over clothing incolonial India. (c) Swadeshi and the movement for Khadi. (Chapter 8)

Unit 2: Contemporary India - I

Term I

1 & 2. India - Size and Location & Physical Features of India: relief, structure, major physiographic units. (Chapter 1 & 2)

3. Drainage: Major rivers and tributaries, lakes and seas, role of rivers in the economy, pollution of rivers, measures to control river pollution. (Chapter 3)

Map Work (3 marks) 

Term II

4. Climate: Factors influencing the climate; monsoon- its characteristics, rainfall and temperature distribution; seasons; climate and human life. (Chapter 4) 

5. Natural Vegetation and Wild Life: Vegetation types, distribution as well as altitudinal variation, need for conservation and various measures. Major species, their distribution, need for conservation and various measures. (Chapter 5)

6. Population: Size, distribution, age-sex composition, population change-migration as a determinant of population change, literacy, health, occupational structure and national population policy: adolescents as under-served population group with special needs. (Chapter 6)

Map Work (3 marks)

Unit 3: Democratic Politics - I

Term I

1 & 2. Democracy in the Contemporary World & What is Democracy? Why Democracy?: What are the different ways of defining democracy? Why has democracy become the most prevalent form of government in our times? What are the alternatives to democracy? Is democracy superior to its available alternatives? Must every democracy have the same institutions and values? (Chapter 1 & 2)

(Part 1.3 and 1.4 (pages 10-18 of prescribed NCERT Textbook) will be assessed through formative assessment only)

3. Constitutional Design: How and why did India become a democracy? How was the Indian constitution framed? What are the salient features of the Constitution? How is democracy being constantly designed and redesigned in India? (Chapter 3)

Term II

4. Electoral Politics: Why and how do we elect representatives? Why do we have a system of competition among political parties? How has the citizens’ participation in electoral politics changed? What are the ways to ensure free and fair elections? (Chapter 4)

5. Working of Institutions: How is the country governed? What does Parliament do in our democracy? What is the role of the President of India, the Prime Minister and the Council of Ministers? How do these relate to one another? (Chapter 5)

6. Democratic Rights: Why do we need rights in a constitution? What are the Fundamental Rights enjoyed by the citizen under the Indian constitution? How does the judiciary protect the Fundamental Rights of the citizen? How is the independence of the judiciary ensured? (Chapter 6)

Unit 4: Economics

Term I

1. The economic story of Palampore: Economic transactions of Palampore and its interaction with the rest of the world through which the concept of production (including three factors of production (land, labour and capital) can be introduced. (Chapter 1)

2. People as Resource: Introduction of how people become resource / asset; economic activities done by men and women; unpaid work done by women; quality of human resource; role of health and education; unemployment as a form of nonutilisation of human resource; socio-political implication in simple form. (Chapter 2)

Term II

3. Poverty as a Challenge: Who is poor (through two case studies: one rural, one urban); indicators; absolute poverty (not as a concept but through a few simple examples) - why people are poor ; unequal distribution of resources; comparison between countries; steps taken by government for poverty alleviation. (Chapter 3)

4. Food Security in India: Source of Foodgrains, variety across the nation, famines in the past, the need for self sufficiency, role of government in food security, procurement of foodgrains, overflowing of granaries and people without food, public distribution system, role of cooperatives in food security (foodgrains, milk and vegetables ration shops, cooperative shops, two-three examples as case studies) (Chapter 4)

Unit 5: Disaster Management

Term I

  • 1. Introduction to Disaster Management (Chapter 1)
  • 2. Common Hazards - Prevention and Mitigation (Chapter 2)

Term II

  • 3. Man made disasters - Nuclear, Biological and Chemical. (Chapter 3)
  • 4. Community Based Disaster Management (Chapter 4)
  •  Paper Pattern: Subjective Paper.
  •                          English-20 marks
  •                          Maths-50 marlks
  •                          Science+Social Science-30 marks

 

            Syllabus for Class – XI Entrance Examination

 Syllabus for Class X Examination will be the contents of Class X and some enriched topic.

 Mathematics Syllabus

First Term Syllabus

UNIT I: NUMBER SYSTEMS

1. REAL NUMBERS

Euclid's division lemma, Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic - statements after reviewing work done earlier and after illustrating and motivating through examples, Proofs of results - irrationality of √2, √3, √5, decimal expansions of rational numbers in terms of terminating/non-terminating recurring decimals.

UNIT II: ALGEBRA

1. POLYNOMIALS

Zeros of a polynomial. Relationship between zeros and coefficients of quadratic polynomials. Statement and simple problems on division algorithm for polynomials with real coefficients.

2. PAIR OF LINEAR EQUATIONS IN TWO VARIABLES

Pair of linear equations in two variables and their graphical solution. Geometric representation of different possibilities of solutions/inconsistency. 

Algebraic conditions for number of solutions. Solution of a pair of linear equations in two variables algebraically - by substitution, by elimination and by cross multiplication method. Simple situational problems must be included. Simple problems on equations reducible to linear equations may be included.

UNIT III: GEOMETRY

1. TRIANGLES

Definitions, examples, counter examples of similar triangles.

  1. (Prove) If a line is drawn parallel to one side of a triangle to intersect the other two sides in distinct points, the other two sides are divided in the same ratio.
  2. (Motivate) If a line divides two sides of a triangle in the same ratio, the line is parallel to the third side.
  3. (Motivate) If in two triangles, the corresponding angles are equal, their corresponding sides are proportional and the triangles are similar.
  4. (Motivate) If the corresponding sides of two triangles are proportional, their corresponding angles are equal and the two triangles are similar.
  5. (Motivate) If one angle of a triangle is equal to one angle of another triangle and the sides including these angles are proportional, the two triangles are similar.
  6. (Motivate) If a perpendicular is drawn from the vertex of the right angle of a right triangle to the hypotenuse, the triangles on each side of the perpendicular are similar to the whole triangle and to each other.
  7. (Prove) The ratio of the areas of two similar triangles is equal to the ratio of the squares on their corresponding sides.
  8. (Prove) In a right triangle, the square on the hypotenuse is equal to the sum of the squares on the other two sides.
  9. (Prove) In a triangle, if the square on one side is equal to sum of the squares on the other two sides, the angles opposite to the first side is a right traingle.

UNIT IV: TRIGONOMETRY

1 . INTRODUCTION TO TRIGONOMETRY

Trigonometric ratios of an acute angle of a right-angled triangle. Proof of their existence (well defined); motivate the ratios, whichever are defined at 0° and 90°. Values (with proofs) of the trigonometric ratios of 30°, 45° and 60°. Relationships between the ratios.

2. TRIGONOMETRIC IDENTITIES

Proof and applications of the identity sin2A + cos2A = 1. Only simple identities to be given. Trigonometric ratios of complementary angles.

UNIT V: STATISTICS AND PROBABILITY

1. STATISTICS

Mean, median and mode of grouped data (bimodal situation to be avoided). Cumulative frequency graph.

Second Term Syllabus

UNIT II: ALGEBRA (Contd.)

3. QUADRATIC EQUATIONS

Standard form of a quadratic equation ax2+bx+c=0, (a ≠ 0). Solution of the quadratic equations (only real roots) by factorization, by completing the square and by using quadratic formula. Relationship between discriminant and nature of roots. 

Situational problems based on quadratic equations related to day to day activities to be incoporated.

4. ARITHMETIC PROGRESSIONS

Motivation for studying Arithmetic Progression Derivation of standard results of finding the nth term and sum of first n terms and their application in solving daily life problems.

UNIT III: GEOMETRY (Contd.)

2. CIRCLES

Tangents to a circle motivated by chords drawn from points coming closer and closer to the point.

  1. (Prove) The tangent at any point of a circle is perpendicular to the radius through the point of contact.
  2. (Prove) The lengths of tangents drawn from an external point to circle are equal.

3. CONSTRUCTIONS

  1. Division of a line segment in a given ratio (internally).
  2. Tangent to a circle from a point outside it.
  3. Construction of a triangle similar to a given triangle.

UNIT IV: TRIGONOMETRY

3. HEIGHTS AND DISTANCES

Simple and believable problems on heights and distances. Problems should not involve more than two right triangles. Angles of elevation / depression should be only 30°, 45°, 60°.

UNIT V: STATISTICS AND PROBABILITY

2. PROBABILITY

Classical definition of probability. Connection with probability as given in Class IX. Simple problems on single events, not using set notation.

UNIT VI: COORDINATE GEOMETRY

1. LINES (In two-dimensions)

Review the concepts of coordinate geometry done earlier including graphs of linear equations. Awareness of geometrical representation of quadratic polynomials. Distance between two points and section formula (internal). Area of a triangle.

UNIT VII: MENSURATION

1. AREAS RELATED TO CIRCLES

Motivate the area of a circle; area of sectors and segments of a circle. Problems based on areas and perimeter / circumference of the above said plane figures. (In calculating area of segment of a circle, problems should be restricted to central angle of 60°, 90° and 120° only. Plane figures involving triangles, simple quadrilaterals and circle should be taken.)

2. SURFACE AREAS AND VOLUMES

(i) Problems on finding surface areas and volumes of combinations of any two of the following: cubes, cuboids, spheres, hemispheres and right circular cylinders/cones. Frustum of a cone.

(ii) Problems involving converting one type of metallic solid into another and other mixed problems. (Problems with combination of not more than two different solids be taken.)

                                                                Science Syllabus

First Term SA-I

Unit I: Chemical Substances - Nature and Behaviour

Chemical reactions: Chemical equation, Balanced chemical equation, implications of a balanced chemical equation, types of chemical reactions: combination, decomposition, displacement, double displacement, precipitation, neutralization, oxidation and reduction.

Acids, bases and salts: Their definitions in terms of furnishing of H+ and OH- ions, General properties, examples and uses, concept of pH scale(Definition relating to logarithm not required), importance of pH in everyday life; preparation and uses of sodium hydroxide, Bleaching powder, Baking soda, Washing soda and Plaster of Paris.

Metals and non metals: Properties of metals and non-metals, reactivity series, formation and properties of ionic compounds, basic metallurgical processes, corrosion and its prevention.

Unit II: World of Living

Life processes: "living being". Basic concept of nutrition, respiration, transport and excretion in plants and animals.

Control and co-ordination in animals and plants: Tropic movements in plants; Introduction to plant hormones; control and co-ordination in animals : nervous system; voluntary, involuntary and reflex action, chemical co-ordination: animal hormones.

Unit IV: Effects of Current

Electric current, potential difference and electric current. Ohm's law; Resistance, Resistivity, Factors on which the resistance of a conductor depends. Series combination of resistors, parallel combination of resistors and its applications in daily life. Heating effect of electric current and its applications in daily life. Electric power, Inter relation between P, V, I and R.

Magnetic effects of current: Magnetic field, field lines, field due to a current carrying conductor, field due to current carrying coil or solenoid; Force on current carrying conductor, Fleming's left hand rule. Electromagnetic induction. Induced potential difference, Induced current. Fleming's Right Hand Rule, Direct current. Alternating current : frequency of AC. Advantage of AC over DC. Domestic electric circuits.

Unit V: Natural Resources

Sources of energy: Different forms of energy, conventional and non-conventional sources of energy: fossil fuels, solar energy; biogas; wind, water and tidal energy; nuclear energy. Renewable versus non-renewable sources.

Second Term SA-II

Unit I: Chemical Substances - Nature and Behaviour

Carbon compounds: Covalent bonding in carbon compounds. Versatile nature of carbon. Homologous series Nomenclature of carbon compounds containing functional groups (halogens, alcohol, ketones, aldehydes, alkanes and alkynes), difference between saturated hydrocarbons and unsaturated hydrocarbons. Chemical properties of carbon compounds (combustion, oxidation, addition and substitution reaction). Ethanol and Ethanoic acid (only properties and uses), soaps and detergents.

Periodic classification of elements: Need for classification, Modern periodic table, gradation in properties, valency, atomic number, metallic and non-metallic properties.

Unit II: World of Living

Reproduction: Reproduction in animal and plants (asexual and sexual) reproductive health-need for and methods of family planning. safe sex vs HIV/AIDS. Child bearing and women's health.

Heridity and evolution: Heredity; Mendel's contribution- Laws for inheritance of traits: Sex determination: brief introduction; Basic concepts of evolution.

Unit III: Natural Phenomenon

Reflection of light at curved surfaces, Images formed by spherical mirrors, centre of curvature, principal axis, principal focus, focal length, mirror formula (Derivation not required), magnification.

Refraction; laws of refraction, refractive index.

Refraction of light by spherical lens, Image formed by spherical lenses, Lens formula (Derivation not required), Magnification. Power of a lens; Functioning of a lens in human eye, defects of vision and their corrections, applications of spherical mirrors and lenses.

Refraction of light through a prism, dispersion of light, scattering of light, applications in daily life.

Unit V: Natural Resources

Conservation of natural resources

Management of natural resources. Conservation and judicious use of natural resources. Forest and wild life, coal and petroleum conservation. Examples of People's participation for conservation of natural resources.

The Regional environment: Big dams : advantages and limitations; alternatives if any. Water harvesting. Sustainability of natural resources.

Our environment: Eco-system, Environmental problems, Ozone depletion, waste production and their solutions. Biodegradable and non-biodegradable substances.

 Social Science

Unit 1: India and the Contemporary World - II

In Sub-unit 1.1 you are required to choose any two themes. In that sub-unit, theme 3 is compulsory and for second theme you are required to choose any one from the first two themes. In Sub Units 1.2 and 1.3 you are required to choose any one theme from each. Thus, you are required to study four themes in all.

Term I

Sub-unit 1.2: Livelihoods, Economies and Societies

Any one of the following themes:

4. The making of Global World: (a) Contrast between the form of industrialization in Britain and India. (b) Relationship between handicrafts and industrial production, formal and informal sectors. (c) Livelihood of workers. Case studies : Britain and India. (Chapter 4)

5. The Age of Indutrialisation: (a) Patterns of urbanization (b) Migration and the growth of towns. (c) Social change and urban life. (d) Merchants, middle classes, workers and urban poor. (Chapter 5)

Case Studies: London and Bombay in the nineteenth and twentieth century.

6. Work, Life and Leisure: (a) Expansion and integration of the world market in the nineteenth and early twentieth century. (b) Trade and economy between the two Wars. (c) Shifts after the 1950s. (d) Implications of globalization for livelihood patterns.

Case study: The post War International Economic order, 1945 to 1960s. (Chapter 6)

Sub-unit 1.3 : Everyday Life, Culture and Politics

Any one of the following themes:

7. Print Culture and the Modern World: (a) The history of print in Europe. (b) The growth of press in nineteenth century India. (c) Relationship between print culture, public debate and politics. (Chapter 7)

8. Novels, Society and History: (a) Emergence of the novel as a genre in the west. (b) The relationship between the novel and changes in modern society. (c) Early novels in nineteenth century India. (d) A study of two or three major writers. (Chapter 8)

Term II

Sub-unit 1.1: Events and processes:

Any two of the following themes:

1. The Rise of Nationalism in Europe: (a) The growth of nationalism in Europe after the 1830s. (b) The ideas of Giuseppe Mazzini, etc. (c) General characteristics of the movements in Poland, Hungary, Italy, Germany and Greece. (Chapter 1)

2. The Nationalist Movement in Indo - China: Factors Leading to Growth of Nationalism in India (a) French colonialism in Indo-China. (b) Phases of struggle against the French. (c) The ideas of Phan Dinh Phung, Phan Boi Chau, Nguyen Ac Quoc (d) The second world war and the liberation struggle. (e) America and the second Indo-China war. (Chapter 2)

3. Nationalism in India: (a) First world war, Khilafat, Non-Cooperation and Civil Disobedience Movement. (b) Salt Satyagraha. (c) Movements of peasants, workers, tribals. (d) Activities of different political groups. (Chapter 3)

Map work based on theme 3 only. (3 marks)

Unit 2: Contemporary India - II

Term I

1. Resources and Development: Types - natural and human; Need for resource planning, natural resources, land as a resource, soil types and distribution; changing land-use pattern; land degradation and conservation measures. (Chapter 1)

2. Forest and Wild Life Resources: Types and distribution, depletion of flora and fauna; conservation and protection of forest and wild life. (Chapter 2)

3. Water Resources: Sources, distribution, utilisation, multi-purpose projects, water scarcity, need for conservation and management, rainwater harvesting. (One case study to be introduced) (Chapter 3)

4. Agriculture: Types of farming, major crops, cropping pattern, technological and institutional reforms; their impact; contribution of Agriculture to national economy - employment and output. (Chapter 4)

Map work [3  marks]

Term II

5. Minerals and Energy Resources: Types of minerals, distribution, use and economic importance of minerals, conservation, types of power resources: conventional and nonconventional, distributionand utilization, and conservation. (Chapter 5)

6. Manufacturing Industries: Types, spatial distribution, contributionof industries to the national economy, industrial pollution and degradation of environment, measures to control degradation. (One case study to be introduced) (Chapter 7) 

7. Life Lines of National Economy (Chapter 8)

Map Work [3 marks]

Unit 3: Democratic Politics - II

Term I

1 & 2. Power Sharing & Federalism: Why and how is power shared in democracies? How has federal division of power in India helped national unity? To what extent has decentralisation achievedthis objective? How does democracy accommodate different social groups?(Chapter 1 & 2)

3 & 4. Democracy and Diversity & Gender Religion and Caste: Are divisions inherent to the working of democracy? What has been the effect of caste on politics and of politics on caste? How has the gender division shaped politics? How do communal divisions affect democracy? (Chapter 3 & 4)

Term II

5 & 6. Popular Struggles and Movements & Political Parties: How do struggles shape democracy in favour of ordinary people? What role do political parties playin competition and contestation? Which are the major national and regional parties in India? Why have social movements come to occupy large role in politics? (Chapter 5 & 6)

7. Outcomes of Democracy: Can or should democracy be judged by its outcomes? What outcomes can one reasonably expect of democracies? Does democracy in India meet these expectations? Has democracy led to development, security and dignity for the people? What sustains democracy in India? (Chapter 7) 

8. Challenges to Democracy: Is the idea of democracy shrinking? What are the major challenges to democracy in India? How can democracy be reformed and deepened? What role can an ordinary citizen play in deepening democracy? (Chapter 8)

Unit 4: Understanding Economic Development

Term I

1. Development: The traditional notion of development; National Income and Per-capita Income. Growth of NI - critical appraisal of existing development indicators (PCI, IMR, SR and other income and health indicators) The need for health and educational development; Human Development Indicators (in simple and brief as a holistic measure of development. The approach to this theme: Use case study of three states (Kerala, Punjab and Bihar) or take a few countries (India, China, Sri Lanka and one developed country) (Chapter 1)

2. Sectors of the Indian Economy: Sectors of Economic Activities; Historical change in sectors; Rising importance of tertiary sector; Employment Generation; Division of SectorsOrganised and Unorganised; Protective measures for unorganised sector workers. (Chapter 2)

Term II

3. Money and Credit: Role of money in an economy: Historical origin; Formal and Informal financial institutions for Savings and Credit - General Introduction; Select one formal institution such as a nationalized commercial bank and a few informal institutions; Local money lenders, landlords, self help groups, chit funds and private finance companies. (Chapter 3) 

4. Globalisation and the Indian Economy: What is Globalisation (through some simple examples); How India is being globalised and why; Development Strategy prior to 1991. State Control of Industries : Textile goods as an example for elaboration; Economic Reforms 1991; Strategies adopted in Reform measures (easing of capital flows; migration, investment flows); Different perspectives on globalisation and its impact on different sectors; Political Impact of globalisation. (Chapter 4) 

5. Consumer Rights: How consumer is exploited (one or two simple case studies) factors causing exploitation of consumers; Rise of consumer awareness; how a consumer should be in a market; role of government in consumer protection. (Chapter 5)

Unit 5: Disaster Management

(Through Formative Assessment only)

  • Tsunami
  • Safer Construction Practices
  • Survival Skills
  • Alternate Communication systems during disasters
  • Sharing Responsibility

FOR  XI MATHAMATICS

 Paper Pattern: Subjective Paper.

                        English-20 marks

                        Maths-50 marks

                        Physics-15 marks

                       Chemistry-15 marks       

FOR  XI  BIO

 Paper Pattern: Subjective Paper.

                        English-20 marks

                         Maths-20 marks

                        Physics-15 marks

                       Chemistry-15 marks

                       Bio- 30 marks   

FOR  XI  Commerce

 Paper Pattern: Subjective Paper.

                         English-30 marks              

                         Maths-40 marks

                       Elementary Commercial GK +  Social Science- 30 marks   

 

 

                            

 

 

 

 

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